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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
of people's eyes, which was about technology, quite critical comments about technology, which seemed quite a bit odd, given that he has only just started using twitter. >> he is not opposed to technology, as such. he is actually quite charming in his use of it -- for example, twitter. i think he is drawing attention to something that concerns a lot of people, not just catholics or christians, and that is that in the revolution, the information revolution that we are living through, the past 30 years or so, we are all of us experiencing the increasing pace of that revolution that is putting people in distress. we experience it has individuals with the phenomenon is burned -- phenomenon of burnout, which is virtually epidemic in the western world. of course, for society, it has a very serious repercussion, mainly that a society where everybody feels overloaded and cannot cope with how much they are being asked to do, it becomes a very uncaring society, a very egotistical society, and ultimately carries the seeds of its own destruction within itself. that was his message. >> what struck you a
a little win. nicoderm cq, the patch with time release smart control technology that acts fast and helps control cravings all day long. ♪ quit one day at a time with nicoderm cq. >>> hello from new york, i'm chris can hayes heave with richard wolffe and the great heather mcgee, carl smith, the university of north carolina chapel hill, contributor to a blog. and socket sony, the migrant workers advocacy group. the latest gdp provisions looks like the economy may finally genuinely be in a real recovery. it increased by 3.1%. of course, we've been here before many times over the past four years and each time it appears that the economy is going to achieve a philosophy, it gets pulled back to earth. there are two issues. cyclical, how and when we will once achieve full employment and strong growth and structural issues, what aspects do the fundamentals of our country work and not work. barack obama has insisted it won't be enough to cover the downturn and the economy needs fundamental reform and invention. >> i know that we'll have to overcome our doubts and our divisions and we're going t
this was not impersonal market forces, this was not technology, this was not globalization. what was happening was american politics and american economics were working against the middle class. people did this. we decided this. if you look at other countries like germany, their middle class is in better shape. they've done better trading against the world, their companies are making money. so a lot of the things we heard that were not impossible, not possible in america are actually happening in germany, and their wages have gone up five times faster that than ours. there's something wrong inside the american economic and political system, and that's what this book is about. >> host: hedrick smith is the author. thank you for being on booktv. >> from the fourth annual boston book festival, a panel featuring author edward glaeser. it's about an hour, 15. >> good afternoon and thank you very much for coming to this auditorium today. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wbur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wo
with the great improvements in technology that unleashed the powers of capitalism, and capitalism manage to produce immense wealth. something unpleasant but -- and at the same time produce poverty that had never been known before. the debt is to capitalism what hell is to christianity. unpleasant, but absolutely necessary. in a sense, capitalism is about ecological economics, even though capitalists don't want to hear this. it is about recycling. we had heard of the term by the 1970's, especially about the green movement in europe. capitalism has always been recycling. the process of described is a process whereby the entrepreneur is now forced to be an entrepreneur. the ex-peasants, they did not choose to be entrepreneurs. they had to be. they used debt. bringing it to the present, energizing the production process, producing the wealth from which he hopes that he will be able to repay the debt. the moneylenders, later the bankers. cover for the fact that he had paid wages for capital goods. hoping there is something left for him, for profit. debt is all about intertemporal recycling. b
, they are rooted in scientific discovery and technological innovation. there has to be a greater appreciation for the role of science and technology in society. we have to get young women engaged early. we found that if young women are engaged in experiments to work, if they are part of the team, it makes a big difference. we try to create an intergene rational mentoring system. when young women come through the ranks through the promotion and tenure process, we have to ensure fairness of the system. it is a complex problem. that is why it is hard for people to talk about it. >> why is it important that there are more women? >> it is important that there be more science. we are about to face what i call the quiet crisis. you have a number of scientists in this country who came of age when i did. they are beginning to retire. those retirements are going to accelerate over the next few years. the second hidden variable is that we depend strongly on immigrants. we have always been a nation of immigrants. i do not think people appreciate how much of our science and engineering work force is made
, the technology revolution. and one reason i think that it's really pretty clear that those are key drivers is this is a global phenomenon. and i do sometimes think the american discourse about it tends to be very american. so i'm always quite entertained when i read about, you know, a paper that says rising income inequality in the united states is due to this one particular law passed in the 980s. -- 1980s. okay, then how does that account for rising income inequality in canada or, indeed, even in france, in germany, in the united kingdom? i mean, it's happening all over the world, it's also happening in emerging markets. but i think it is important to face that scary because if you see it just as a political phenomenon, you know, you're going to lose sight of what i think is the biggest challenge which is that these, actually, quite benign economic forces, right? i love the technology revolution, i'm a google addict. they're also drivers of social and political consequences which are not quite so benign. the way i like to look at it, and this is a quote from peter orszag, is, you know, h
, then distribution, then production. in conjunction with the great improvements in technology that unleashed the powers of capitalism, and capitalism manage to produce immense wealth, and at the same time produce poverty that had never been known before. the debt is to capitalism what hell is to christianity. unpleasant, but absolutely necessary for it to work. in a sense, capitalism is about ecological economics, even though capitalists don't want to hear this. it is about recycling. we had heard of the term by the 1970's, especially about the green movement in europe. capitalism has always been recycling. the process of described is a process whereby the entrepreneur is now forced to be an entrepreneur. the ex-peasants, they did not choose to be entrepreneurs. they had to be. they used debt. bringing it to the present, energizing the production process, producing the wealth from which he hopes that he will be able to repay the debt. the moneylenders, later the bankers. cover for the fact that he had paid wages for capital goods. hoping there is something left for him, for profit. debt is a
of information technology. >> our motto is to protect private data but to use public data. our government data should be electronically accessible. those ideas date from the 1980's. >> information security and censorship are major themes of this year's congress, billed as europe's biggest gathering of independent computer experts. one star guest was u.s. internet activist jake of applebaum -- jacob applebaum. he warns that governments are increasingly spying on citizens and said there are plans to build in that massive data mining centers in the u.s. there was also criticism of germany for the data it collects in the name of security. >> we see some services want to break into their citizens computers. the goal is to control the networks. this happens in china, saudi arabia, and india. while european and american politicians flirt with censuring the internet or restricting it. of course we oppose that. >> among the club's hacktivists, programmers and i.t. experts have boosted attendance to record levels. >> when we come back, we look at the fate of syrian refugees. >> we'll be back in just one
of years as opposed to decades or centuries, because that's what the capitalists and did through technology and innovation, the moment you start doing that, like having a machine that prints money, so you want to use more faster and more intensely, producing more money. if you overreach and take too much value from the future to bring it into the present, you too. the sectors in which this dynamic annapolis process is manchin to push the boundaries of technology and create wealth -- in amsterdam and holland the with-it is always local lines. there will always be surplus riches. regis and surplus regions. southern england was in debt. now is the obvious. similarly, you have new york state in surplus, washington state inertification plus. it started in manchester, in amsterdam. it is always localized. there will always be defecit regions and surplus regions. so, manchester northern england was in surplus back then. southern england was in debt. now it is the opposite. similarly, you have new york state in surplus, washington state in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your eq
to support a growing population. we have not develop the technologies to solve those problems. here at home we have a very high unemployment rate. and of course, we have a generation of aging baby boomers, like myself, who are wondering how we are going to support ourselves and our retirement. these are all big problems. my thesis is that we will get much further toward solving them if we can engage the power of the private sector to contribute to peace and prosperity. i tell people, i love corporations. i study them the way jane goodall studies chimpanzees. and i appreciate their potential to help solve their as problems -- to help solve those problems, to provide jobs to people who need to make a living, and provide decent investment returns. to come up with the technologies that can help us have a more sustainable future where we are in harmony with the environment and the planet. a lot of corporations are doing those things, but not as well as corporations could. corporations could contribute still more toward human welfare and avoid doing damage in some areas where they do, if only we
just this last hour while the message itself does not change the technology does. would you believe 3-d? yep. 80 years after the queen's grandfather began the tradition with a crackly address over wireless elizabeth ii wished the brits a happy christmas in 3-d. >>> in his christmas day message to the city and the world pope benedict xvi appealed for piece in countries at war with themselves. he singled out mali, nigeria, and especially syria. >> translator: yes, may peace be brought for the people of syria, deeply wounded and divided by a conflict which does not spare even the defenseless and reaps innocent victims. once again, i appeal for an end to the bloodshed. easier access for the relief of refugees and the displaced and dialogue in the pursuit of a political solution to the conflict. >> last night as always the pope celebrated christmas eve mass in st. peter's basilica. he reminded christians everywhere to leave room for god in their busy lives. >>> you can't get closer to christmas than church of the nativity in bethlehem. ♪ >> vast crowds turned out for midnight mass near the
the courage to negotiate a lasting peace. yesterday the pope talked about the lure of technology taking time away from war shopping god. >> pilgrims from around the world flock to belles a to bethlehem lining up to see the birthplace of jesus. leland vittert live from bethlehem, sending christmas greetings to us like nobody else can. merry christmas to you. >> reporter: you're right it is really a roo tphaoebg and magical place on earth to be for chris nass. i'm going t christmas. you see the christmas tree all lit up and past that the church of the nativity where tonight there are a couple of thousands of people lined up trying to head inside and down to the bible when th grothe tow where the bible said jesus was born two m ma malennia go. the pope took a political penned talking about the nation of palestine certainly on the mind of a lot of people here, a lot of locals in bethlehem and the west bank. nobody really does christmas celebrations like they do in the west bank. palestinian boy scouts marched in with snare drums through the streets down the star road, the famous road that lead i
smart control technology that acts fast and helps control cravings all day long. ♪ quit one day at a time with nicoderm cq. anyone have occasional constipation, diarrhea, gas, bloating? yeah. one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues with three strains of good bacteria. approved! [ female announcer ] live the regular life. phillips'. yeah we both relieve coughs, sneezing, aches, fevers. and i relieve nasal congestion. overachiever. [ female announcer ] tylenol® cold multi-symptom nighttime relieves nasal congestion. nyquil® cold and flu doesn't. >> finally tonight, it began as a lesson in holiday humility, that it is better to give than to receive. two years later, it's now a major effort to help those that need it most. one burrito at a time. ben tracey has the story. >> reporter: it began with a lengthy christmas wish list. >> i asked for an iphone, mac book air and ipad, and an ipod. >> reporter: and a very frustrated dad. >> i went, this is too much and i didn't want to raise a spoiled child. >> reporter: michael johnson
of the technological and productivity innovations of dp. >> and raising their price target, domino's pizza continues its nice run that stock up more than 1%. back to you, simon. >>> meanwhile, of course a major storm hitting the east coast and affecting travel across the region. we will update own the storm's latest track after the break. >>> and still ahead hurricane the dollar has had a phenomenal run against the yen over the last three months. cot fiscal cliff derail the green back's rally? we are back in two. when you have diabetes... your doctor will say get smart about your weight. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. [ male announcer ] glucerna hunger smart. a smart way to help manage hunger and diabetes. mine was earned off vietnam in 1968. over the south pacific in 1943. i got mine in iraq, 2003. usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because it offers a superior level of protection, and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans and their fam
the decision, you will probably reach a different decision about that toxic technology. how it is being produced, letting people make their decisions makes quite a difference. this gets done now. where to produce. of the workers in every enterprise made a decision where to produce, how many would close the factory and move to china? i would guess probably non. close to zero. what of thought, that the workers who had to live with a factory that closes, live in a community that will be affected by factories the close, and workers themselves make the decision. here is another one. for chris decide what to do with the profits, here's an interesting thing we expect. over the last 30 years with boards of directors, we have noticed something i am sure you have all noticed, the boards of directors decided to use the profits they were earning to give enormous increases in the salaries to top executives. we are famous in america for that. thee aratio of one executive ge to an average worker is 300 to 40s all other countries. so we have been in a major part of the ineq0 lity that i talked about be
. we look at the major advances in science and technology. "newsroom" starts now. good morning. thank you so much for being with us. i'm carol costello wishing you and yours a very merry christmas. we begin this hour with pope benedict using his annual christmas message to speak about the hope for peace even in the most difficult times and situations. just hours ago the 85-year-old pope spoke before a crowd in st. peter's square and to millions of others watching around the world he says even in syria, a nation embroiled in a nearly two-year long civil war, peace is possible. >> translator: may peace bring for the people of syria, deeply wounded and divided by a conflict which does not spare even the defenseless and reaps innocent victims. once again, i appeal for an end to the bloodshed. easier access for the relief of refugees and the displaced and dialogue in the pursuit of a political solution to the conflict. >> the pope also spoke out against violence against christians in nigeria and wrapped up his address by delivering christmas greetings in 65 languages. >>> in bethlehem peop
ruining the season as kids get more accustomed to technology? >> microsoft windows 8 gets more bad press today, as "the new york times" said it is not leading to a boost in pc sales. is there anything that can turn that lagging sector around? futures moving lower, as concerns about the fiscal cliff talks weigh on the market. talks about progress toward a deal sent the down lower by almost 521 points on friday. s&p up almost 14% on the year. it's interesting, this year we've had so many unnatural phenomenon taking place, whether it's the effects of the fed's monetary policy, year end, fiscal cliff tax related issues. the motivations are a little bit different this time around than they were last year. >> yeah. it's not as pressing, some would argue. some were actually saying on friday, maybe it would have been better if the markets had a sharper sell-off because that could have forced the lawmakers to do something as opposed to leave for obama to have a hastily called friday evening press conference saying, you know what, congress, you have ten days, you go work it out. it's doable. >> it
could be anywhere, but investigators got lucky because there's a little-known technology built into that photo and it offered investigators a huge break. >> they didn't know that a photograph taken on an iphone and e-mailed to somebody else has gps coordinates on it? >> yeah. >> i didn't know that. >> we were quickly able to check the photograph and check the gps coordinates and then we know exactly where that photograph had been taken. >> investigators rushed to this location in jacksonville. >> how long after you looked at that photograph did you have agents headed to the scene where it was taken? >> minutes. >> but there was no one there. ♪ ♪ >> later that night the kidnappers called back and quinn's mother, again, at the urging of the fbi kept up a tough negotiating stance. >> i want quinn in my car. i'm just warning you. i'm not give young the money until you have quinn in the car. >> i'm telling you what to do. >> i'm telling you what i'm going to do. >> did that aggressive approach seem to work? >> i think so. i really think so. >> another ransom drop was planned. >>
. >> everything lives forever in technology. it does. >> it doesn't. >> it will be interesting to see on the next reading on users if users come back, because instagram denounced what they're going to do with the photos. >> it's amazing how one lawyer, one draft had such a big affect. >> exactly. >>> markets are set to decline sharply at the open. how do you prepare for today's session? we'll get the word from the street, that is next. and jim paulson tells us why he's expecting a 15 to 20% gain for the s&p 500 in 2013. looks like we're going to lose 10.5 on the s&p right at the open. more "squawk on the street," right ahead. p for an idea. a grand idea called america. the idea that if you work hard, if you have a dream, if you work with your neighbors... you can do most anything. this led to other ideas like liberty and rock 'n' roll. to free markets, free enterprise, and free refills. it put a man on the moon and a phone in your pocket. our country's gone through a lot over the centuries and a half. but this idea isn't fragile. when times get tough, it rallies us as one. every day, more people
of changing -- changing technology. but let me make two more points about young people. let me tell you two stories about poland. we were in poland i think eight years ago in september i was going to visit the supreme courts in poland. and when you go to european countries you have to go to three supreme courts often, the constitution court, the administrative court, and a court of general jurisdiction. you go to three dinners and bring three gifts. [laughter] >> but there are fine judges and fine courts. at first i was teaching in krakow for a few days and then went to warsaw and i ranged to meet with the faculty at the university of warsaw and they explained the students wouldn't be there. it's the third week in september. i don't think they were coming until the first week in october. but the fact we were going to be there, arranged for me to meet with the faculty, and we did. midway through the meeting, though, there are some notes being passed and they said oh, justice kennedy, we didn't realize our answering law students are here for an orientation day and would like you to talk with
forces coming through to the forefront that you need not just to have your technology side, you need to have your presentation side, you need your customer side. i think this is a market that if you make the right choices could very well flourish in all parts of the world. >> how are you dealing with the price war in france between telecom operators. how is it affecting your business? >> let me take the european perspective. i don't think it's a french problem. i sincerely think if you look to why it is that the u.s. is so ahead in that generation, it's because of the business environment. the business environment. what are you allowed to do? because this is a regulated business. and what is the macroeconomic environment? macro, you can do nothing about. if you look at what they're allowed to do, i'm afraid that we still have a very unfortunate situation in europe, we have 28 regulators. we have regulation that is based only on basically low pricing and if you compare with the fcc and the u.s., it also has to look to innovation and new investments. that is not the case in europe. you
of -- stems? raise your hand. stands for science, technology, engineering and math, and these are the jobs which are going to be around in the future. actual he the key jobs of the new jersey economy and we should all go to our local councils, our partner organizations, and we're trying to incorporate the significance of stem within schools and colleges around the city, and i challenge every single youth parliament member here today to go away to your cities and councils and partner organizations and try to encourage them to incorporate the significance of stem program within your schools and colleges and come back next year and share with us what you found. these are the jobs of the knowledge economy. >> now, i'm looking for a london woman. a london woman who has not spoken before. have you spoken before? you did. i think it wouldn't be fair to others. i thought you had spoken earlier. this woman is going to fall off her seat and i want to see that. that would be a sadness. >> i'm -- thank you, mr. speaker. thank you. [applause] >> anybody here who knows today that i was desperate to pike
is the technology and the other is the demand and fundraising. they spend so much time raising money and the do not have time to spend together. everything is different. nothing about the senate is better other than the influx of women. there was one woman in the senate that i wrote about. the fact that we have 20 now, which is a record, that makes a big difference. on the other hand, the hyper partisan senate is interesting. a number of people have said over time, boy, the senators now must not like your book. they're fine with the book. they do not think much of the senate. [laughter] my sympathy extends to a certain point. they have the power to change it. it does not have to be the way that it is. >> i want to go back to a point that he made. the humprrerey thing. what they leave out, it was a tough race. roll call was predicting humphrey would beat him. they gave the vote count and everything else. kennedy started working for five years to make sure byrd never becomes majority leader. he interviews a number of people. he does not want to take byrd onto himself. he is looking for a person
of retrotoys. the fergy with brand new technology. power rangers. it was exciting for me to see the toys that i enjoyed as a kid and see our kids enjoying them today. >> let's talk about apple. i was in the apple store the other day and i walked in and said, recession? what recession. it's unbelievable. no matter what time of day it's bustling. your poll shows that 49% of people on your website do want an iphone when it comes to a smartphone. 41% -- excuse me, that should be 49%. 41% want an ipad if you're talking about a tablet. they don't have the entire market but they certainly have -- it's like when you talk about kleenex you mean tissue. it's the same kind of thing? >> it is becoming that way. you know? ipod became the new music player and that was the ubiquitous term for it. it's all about the design. they're so cool looking. with ipad in particular, we were talking about this last night at home. not everyone has a use for an ipad and it's very specific functionality. however, you see one and you have to have one regardless of whether you really need it or not and i think that they'll re
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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